In memoriam Professor Dr. Gabriele Stein

written by Keith Brown (University of Cambridge)

Gabriele Stein was born in July 1942 in Tilsit in what was then East Prussia. In the closing years of the war, with the Russian armies approaching, her family moved west to Tübingen. There she became an assistant to Hans Marchand in the University of Tübingen and in 1971 gained her PhD in English linguistics. She went on to positions in English Language and Linguistics in the Universities of Siegen (1974-81) and Hamburg (1981-1990) and from 1990 was Professor of English Linguistics in the University of Heidelberg. In 1984 she and Randolph Quirk married. She was the founder and president of the European Association for Lexicography. She died on March 6, 2020.  

She will be remembered for her work in historical and contemporary lexicography and in English language. Stein 2014 and Stein 2017 are studies of Renaissance lexicographers such as Thomas Elyot and John Palsgrave and their attempts to understand the semantic range of a word and to explain and transpose it into other languages. Stein 2002 examines how contemporary EFL dictionaries approach a similar range of issues. Of course she taught English grammar in her various professorial posts in Germany. She also collaborated with Randolph Quirk on work for the British National Curriculum.


References:

Stein, G.  2014. Sir Thomas Elyot as Lexicographer. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Stein, G. 2017. Word Studies in the Renaissance. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Stein G. 2002. Better Words: Evaluating EFL Dictionaries. Exeter University Press. 

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